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Thursday 30th June 2022How Amapiano Took Over The WorldBy Shiba Melissa Mazaza - @iamshiba 🌍

In this Homecoming special feature, South African music journalist and amapiano aficionado @iamshiba tracks the growth of the immersive genre from its origins in the underground house scene to the global movement it has since become. 🇿🇦

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Monday 28th March 2022What You Need to Know About Nigeria’s Skate SceneBy Pei Koroye - @xxw00shyw0rldxx

Following recent developments in both Accra and Lagos’ skating infrastructure, we wanted to take a closer look at the scene in Nigeria! 🇳🇬

For Pt. 1 of our skateboarding focus, we spoke to young writer and skater Pei Koroye, who gives her perspective on Nigeria’s skate scene past and present.

“It cannot be understated just how important it is for counterculture to exist in countries like Nigeria which has a history of being socially conservative and more than a little bit suspicious of young people going against societal norms. In terms of its infrastructure, the country isn't really built for skating. It’s amazing that the culture has grown the way it has despite this - like flowers sprouting up through concrete.”

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Monday 28th March 2022
Sounds of Resistance
By Sagal Mohammed - @sagalamo

Music is intrinsic to understanding the core of Black experiences across the globe. Seamlessly sown into the fabrics of our culture and identity, Black music - in its plethora of forms - has soundtracked revolutionary parts of history in Africa, the Caribbean and North America since its inception, acting as armour against oppression and shifting political landscapes, all whilst connecting communities through shared struggles and the exhilarating highs of Black love and joy.

Between the 1800s and the late 1960s, we were comforted by the soothing sounds of Etta James and Sam Cooke. In the 70s and 80s, we were empowered by the rallying roars of Fela Kuti and NWA, whose lyrics still paint a vivid picture of the criminal and societal injustices bestowed upon Black bodies in our present day. Every song ignited a new spirit for revolution and a unified confidence to fight back - a feeling of strength that was echoed by a new generation of Black talent as we entered a new century.

While the essence of resistance remains within Black music to the present day, the focus has shifted back onto the protection of our peace through songs that prioritized celebrating Blackness, creating new spaces for us and gatekeeping our culture where necessary; take Solange’s A Seat At The Table.

Ultimately, each era of modern history has brought its own sound of resistance for the Black community worldwide. Here, we revisit a few key moments…


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Pic by Steven John Irby - @stevesweatpants





Monday 28th March 2022
Drills journey to Africa
By Nicolas-Tyrell Scott - @iamntyrell

It is almost impossible to ignore the effects of Drill music globally and especially now across Africa. Here, culture writer Nicolas-Tyrell Scott can intro you to the scene…

From Lil Durk to Headie One, drill and its many variants across the Atlantic and on the continent, have canvassed raw, uninterrupted socio-economic realities for the world to see, while, in tandem, allowed the orators to ascend to commercial glory.

In its multi-dimensional flair, what can’t be forgotten is the framing of the genre, and early demonisations of the sound across the ‘10s — from conglomerates, to popular national media hubs. Ultimately, beneath the surface, drill has educated, mourned, entertained, illuminated and united a diaspora of people (from producers, to writers, to artists), in the context of a complexly interdependent globe in 2021.

From my early experiences of the sound, listening to Durk, as well as Chief Keef, Bobby Shmurda, OFB, Skengdo & AM, Drillminister and more, the rapid expansion of the sound, allowed for a new generation of artists to grow in real time and for political failures on communal levels to be exposed for the masses to see.

As the drill ecosystem continues to expand, read the piece above for a brief insight into the birth and subsequent growth of drill — from Chicago to the African continent.


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Taking the world to africa and africa to the world